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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
commercial real estate? i guess that you were all looking and listening to chairman bernanke when he talked about the next wave of defaults in the real estate area. >> yes. chair come well last questions, thank you very much -- develop last request questions. new loan fund than they did under the t.a.r.p. capital programs. one very important difference is that tarp was intended to provide capital for banks to assure their viability under conditions. this is powerful program designed to get banks to lend because as you know the dividend rate on this new capital can drop dramatically if and only if banks lend beyond where they are lending today. couple other points. the small banks we're talking about, have done a pretty good job of maintaining lending balances during this very difficult recession. we think many of them are eager to lend, and by providing them with more capital, in this case capital that could increase their tier 1 capital by 30 to 50% they should be more confident about able to support existing assets and increase their lending at the same time. >> it just brings me back mem
. bernanke will lay out a plan for credit tightening. another big headline, former merrill lynch chief john thain picked to lead cit. it brings together two prominent casualties of the credit crisis. >> "the washington post" after the massive snowstorm, they are ready to get hit again tomorrow. >> the snow at their home was up to their waist. >> your mom has an art exhibit here. what are they 82? >> 82 and 80. and they drove up. >> once you have to drive through nazi check posts to escape the country, it's nothing getting through jersey. >> i was worried, but they are just fine. she has a big opening tonight it will be fun. >> my art exhibit was there last week. >> it was? did you show your postcards? that's good. >>> michael lke allen has the m playbook. the joint summit on health care. i like the idea if you think it will give the idea of health care reform momentum. >> well, sure. i think people in both parties wonder why now? we said on this show, one of the easiest things for the president to have done was to call republicans, turn on c-span, msnbc and say what have you got? he is fina
true. >> and#rone more question. how independent are you and how much is ben bernanke your boss? >> well, we're, we're,çó tçóhÑi reserve banks are set up to be independent but, the board of governors does have what they have general oversightçó responsibility for the 12 banks o#ty correctly. we're autonomousçó and the chairman of the federal reserve is the chairman of the board of governors, the federaokv?;búr's imÑ authority, and w7riÑiÑin that r. but i also have a board of directors from my çÑegion, ñran they're my boss asÑi well, or ty are my boss. and they can fire me. and or fail to reappoint my and so, i have a hot of oversight. and i think it is very important, though, that i have this board of directors because that brings that independent to the open market committee and that's essential and tha>e's w we were designed the way we were. >> you have the longest tenureÑ of all of the presidents of the federal reserve. you have been in that positñrio since 19ñfñ and been with theÑip of kÑ.nsas city since 1981 in various positions. and let's takeÑi ca
for banks in the country. host: ben bernanke referred yesterday to short-term political liability for this. guest: i think he is absolutely correct. people tend, under these kinds of conditions, to one to blame someone. the problem with that is there are plenty of people to blame. we deregulated the industry. the congress deregulated the industry. there was a culture, if you will, of deregulation. and this encouraged some of what i call speculative activities that led to the bubbles and then the collapse. yes, you had this reaction. i think it is an overreaction, and the outcome would be -- as you try to blame someone you get worse outcomes rather than better outcomes, and i think that is what the chairman was trying to communicate. host: does the banking committee and the members, are they right to be angry at the fete at all? guest: if they're going to be angry, i think they have to be angry at everyone, including themselves. they allow these organizations to get bigger and more risk oriented. and yes, and regulatory agencies because of this culture -- the regulatory agencies because of
velshi later today. >> a lot of great stuff. >> ben bernanke will testify on the hill today. >> we'll get his prescription or a forecast on what will happen with the overall economy. a lot of questions. when will this economy be back to normal and what is normal? that means your job, home and bank. let's take a look at where we stand. the national association of business economics predicts job growth is on its way, forecasting 140,000 jobs per month will be added in 2010. in the new normal, no thing is ever as it seems. yesterday we found out mass layoffs rose last month for the first time since august. more than 180,000 folks fell victim to mass layoffs in january. we saw consumer confidence tumble. consumers are still very nervous. how about your house? your biggest asset most likely or what was once your biggest asset. one out of every four mortgages is under water. it means you owe more than the house is worth. foreclosure will continue. speaking of lenders, banks still in trouble. one out of 11 banks is at risk of going under. that's the problem bank lift, 140 banks were shut down la
left the u.s. >>> ben bernanke has been sworn in for a second term as chairman of the federal reserve. bernanke vowed to preserve the fed's independence, despite a move in congress to tighten control over the central bank. >>> and preparing for a snowy weekend from 1 inch in new york to almost 2 feet in baltimore. meteorologist rob marciano tracking this massive winter storm. what's going on. feast appetizer. [dinner bell chimes] high quality ingredients like wild alaskan salmon in a delicate broth, without by-products or fillers. fancy feast appetizers. celebrate the moment. in the north of england to my new job at the refinery in the south. i'll never forget. it used one tank of petrol and i had to refill it twice with oil. a new car today has 95% lower emissions than in 1970. exxonmobil is working to improve cars, liners of tires, plastics which are lighter and advanced hydrogen technologies that could increase fuel efficiency by up to 80%. >[t:p][n:e plastics which are lighter and advanced hydrogen technologies announcer: the smallest moments can have the biggest impact on a child
her terribly. >> some of the stories this morning at 10:00 a.m., ben bernanke is on capitol hill. all ears will listen to his take on job creation. this afternoon, the president will make his case for creating more jobs. it's going to happen at the business round table. >>> this afternoon in vancouver, fresh off the upset of team canada, the u.s. men's hockey team takes on switzerland. >> usa! usa! >> something tells me you are watching. >>> a star sentenced to five years in prison for shooting his limmo driver. it's been years coming. >> eight years in the running. this is a guy who literally had it all at one point. an nba all-star. one of the richest contracts in the league. prosecutors say he was playing with a shotgun, shot his driver, tried to cover it up. yesterday, a new jersey judge sentenced him to five years in prison. afterwards, he said he was sorry. >> i sincerely apologize for my actions that caused his death. i pray that today brings you some comfort. my children, you deserve a better father. son, brothers than i have been. >> he was apologizing to his victims there. h
, and if the government pulls back too fast, if bernanke pulls back too fast or if the executive congressional branches pull back too fast, there is a question whether it would worsen things, i think that's legitimate. what i do believe you can put into place trigger mechanisms on medicare reforms, on medicaid reforms, on social security reforms, so that these things are in law and they're not just sort in imagination. it's hard, as you know, nor invei for investors to have much confidence in the future of the nation's finances when there's nothing and it's just talk and we're just continuing to talk. >> on that very point, there was a new report on rising life expectancy, which is a great thing, a great triumph of human medicine, but, you know, why don't we talk about raising the retirement age for medicare and social security gradually over the next 20, 30 years. it would save a lot of money. >> that's going to be a big discussion that we'll be having on this show very regularly, and we'll call on both of you to do it again, david gergen, cnn analyst, and stephen moore, "wall street journal" writer.
in place. we had hank, ben bernanke tim geithner and sheila bair the head of the fdic. i know a lot of people in finance and a lot of people in business and government. and i can't think of for that would have done a better job of getting us through that. now it's kind of fashionable to look back and pick at one aspect or another of what was happening and our country's financial system froze up during that period. some of you in this room were at a party i was at in september of 2008, one to talk was the money market funds saved. if we have 3.5 trillion fun missile by 30 million people who on is and they might are worrying about whether they can get their money that was half of all the process held by u.s. banks at the time you have a panic. you had commercial paper frees up entirely in the biggest companies of the united states and some are described in this book that worried whether they were going to meet their payroll and a short period of time to read the sixth largest bank in the country in terms of the domestic deposits, washington mutual failed over a weekend. you had the th
closed yesterday. investors did have time to digest the news. the chairman of the fed ben bernanke basically telegraphed all this. he said that he was going to essentially be pushing up rates, tightening policy last week when he spoke before congress. analysts say the increase in the increase rate indicates that the fed is winding down a series of extraordinary programs it put in place to ease the economic crisis. so, in other words, the crisis is over. the rate increase is not going to directly affect borrowing costs for consumers and most businesses, but, as you see, it's putting the stock market under a little bit of pressure. right now we've got the dow off a little more than 27 points. also under pressure, shares of dell, the computer giant, reported disappointing fourth quarter earnings. sales rose during the holiday season, but those sales were cropped up by steep discounts that did cut into the company's bottom line. finally, well, the saints came marching in to the nyse this morning. three members of the super bowl champion new orlean saints rang that opening bell, looks l
bernanke who was named by bush the federal reserve chairman, henry paulson, the treasury secretary. they said if they didn't do this bailout, the abyss would've happened and it wouldn't have been a recession, it would have been a depression. >> well, you know, a lot of people did offer that chicken little scenario. and equally other economists and people in the real banking world, for example, a communication i received from the president of bb & t asking the 435 members of the house and the 100 members of the senate not to vote in favor of the bailout because the money would not end up being used by banks to be loaned to consumers and you would have banks under the thumb of greater government control. and, indeed, though i don't like to use hank bolson as a source, he made it very clear that while mccain in the end supported it, when john suspended his campaign to go back to washington, and voters thought he's going to make a stand for us. john, instead of being the tell it like it is straight talk express guy, he meekly read a couple of talking points and went ahead with the whol
. with your support in mr. paulson, mr. bernanke we forced their stearns shareholders from a position that i think was a high of $170 a share in january. we force them down to $2 a share because the american taxpayer money was in the bailout. and that was something that was supported by the fed, by treasury because we felt that because the taxpayer was bailing them out, that the shareholders of bear stearns should not be held harmless. now, you have a different situation here, slightly different. a number of weeks later, where we have aig going under, and these are credit default swaps so the money going into aig is going right out to the counterparties. this is a pass through and the folks on the other side are goldman sachs. that is the principle beneficiary of all this. and we don't negotiate in nickel, not a sense of what they are getting. you are in the same position. you are supposed to be negotiating on behalf of the american people. you were saying the regulations were different. let me tell you something we were changing the rules and regulations every single day. we were taking act
might not remember this because we probably didn't keep track of everything that paulson and bernanke and george bush did, but lehman falls on september 15. then what we have on september 23, the chairman of the federal reserve and the secretary of treasury come into congress and they testify that they need $700 billion. they have a 2 1/2-page bill. they don't know what they're going to do with the money. but if you don't give it to them, it's world is going to end. that makes you uncomfortable if you're deciding what to do with your investment. not only that, but the next day, the president of the united states comes on national television and says the following, speaking to the american people to get them calmed down a little bit. he said financial assets related to home mortgages have lost value during the housing decline and the banks holding these assets have restricted credit. as a result, our entire economy is in danger. so i propose that the federal government reduce the risk posed by these trouble assets and supply urgently needed money so banks and other financial institutio
in adjournment until friday 9:30, february 26. that is followed by federal reserve chairman ben bernanke's testimony before the senate banking committee. >> i come from latin america. i am never expecting to find this kind of poverty. >> photographer and documentary filmmaker on a different side of the nation's capital in the shadow of power, sunday on c-span's q. and a. >> homeland security secretary janet napolitano testified before a house in a about her agency's budget request for the next fiscal year. she answered questions about the consolidation of some of the department's programs and denied reports that the board of security staff has been cut. this is three hours. >> the committee on homeland security will come to order. the committee's meeting today to receive testimony from secretary janet napolitano on the presidents fy2011 budget request for the department of homeland security. i want to thanks secretary napolitano for being flexible about testifying in support of the president's fiscal year 2011 budget request for the department of homeland security after back-to-back bliz
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)